Six Ways To Protect Your Cell Phone From Yourself and From Hackers

Your cell phone is a very, very powerful tool. Most of you don’t have a simple flip phone, but you have a smart phone that has complex software and features built into it and that you can add. Hackers, looking for any opportunity to steal your information, would love to get your hands on your data, don’t let them. Here’s a few things to consider.

(image credit – cellphones.org)

  1. If you are using your cell phone for highly confidential information that a competitor, money driven hacker or foreign government would want to access, work with a security expert to harden your phone.
  2. If you’re a “regular” cell phone user be careful what applications you download and only download them from secure web sites such as the Apple, Google, RIM or Microsoft app stores.
  3. Change the default passwords on everything on your phone that has a password, including your voice mail.
  4. Be careful who you allow to “borrow” your phone.
  5. Be careful in using WiFi on your phone. Sign onto a compromised WiFi network and the information you’re transmitting can be sniffed by a hacker.
  6. The best way to protect your phone is to pull out the battery.

The New York Times writes  about this more, here’s a quote from their article:

“Individuals can have a significant impact in protecting themselves from the kind of fraud and cybercrimes we’re starting to see in the mobile space,” said Paul N. Smocer, the president of Bits, the technology policy division of the Financial Services Roundtable, an industry association of more than 100 financial institutions.

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Ramon Ray, Editor & Technology Evangelist, Smallbiztechnology.com . Editor and Founder, Smart Hustle Magazine Full bio at http://www.ramonray.com . Check him out on Google Plus, Twitter or Facebook

2 thoughts on “Six Ways To Protect Your Cell Phone From Yourself and From Hackers

  1. Anonymous

    I disagree
    with two things here:

    1)
    “Sign onto a compromised WiFi network and the information you’re
    transmitting can be sniffed by a hacker.” – This is only possible if the
    user is browsing and inputting sensitive information on an unsecured website
    (aka one not using SSL.) Most of the time, if using smart browsing and online
    shopping/banking habits, that shouldn’t be an issue, even if on a compromised
    wireless network.

    2) “The
    best way to protect your phone is to pull out the battery.” – While this
    is true, unless you are holding extremely sensitive information on your phone
    (security access values, extremely sensitive government information, etc.) you
    should never need to pull out the battery on your phone to “protect”
    your data.

     

    Reply

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