6 Myths About Cloud Backup You Probably Thought Were True

The Cloud is a beautiful thing. It serves us with tons of off-site utilities we would otherwise pay barrels of money to have on-site. What would we do without it? That’s an easy answer: We’d still be back in the stone age of business, tipping our hats to the much larger enterprises who overtake us and absorb our client base. The Cloud gives you power, but do you really understand that power?

Here’s the problem: Cloud technology has advanced so much that most people didn’t have the time to understand one technology before another one just popped up right out of the blue. What are we to do with such enormous change? It’s time we got our facts straight about Cloud-based backup solutions.

Cloud backup is one of the oldest off-site technologies to hit the market, and even after many years running, people still don’t fully understand what they can and cannot do with it, or what they should do to make sure it works for them. CrashPlan, a company that offers Cloud-based secure backups for a number of residences and businesses, has felt the need to debunk the following six major myths about Cloud backup:

Myth #1:  Backup is like syncing a device? Actually, it’s not. While a sync might place data from one device onto another platform, it’s not like a backup, which keeps archived records of changes made to a particular piece of data. A sync doesn’t keep older versions of files, making it difficult or impossible to recover the original version.

Myth #2:  All online backups work pretty much the same. This is a very common misconception stemmed from the oversimplification of the backup process. When you back up a file, it can be anything from a simple drop-off of the copy to a new location to the complexity of a fully 256-bit AES-encrypted data storage solution that protects your data from leakage, both internally and externally. Choose your backup provider carefully! Try going for a “Zero-Knowledge” policy.

Myth #3:  The initial backup process is time-consuming. While this is true (even in cases where the backup solution compresses data before storage), you’d bet your bippy that there are companies that will let you send over a drive that you want backed up so they can mirror it. Just like you, online backup firms hate to waste time!

Myth #4:  It takes a gruesomely long time to retrieve data. Just like the last point, this is also partly true. Many companies will give you a slower downstream to help minimize the impact of your retrieval on their servers. Some companies, however, allow you to get your files mailed to you quickly for a small fee.

Myth #5:  Online backup can be costly. Many companies ask for a “per-computer” rate of around $5 with a data cap in their basic plans. Don’t forget, though, that there are also companies that let you back up an unlimited amount of data for just $6 per month per household.

Myth #6:  I only need an online backup solution. While online backup is awesome, don’t underestimate the power of hard media. Keep an extra hard drive at hand with a mirrored copy of everything on your computer. You won’t regret it! Together with an online backup, even a fire can’t stop you!

Hopefully, these six points will clear something up for you in the end and help you consider getting a backup solution. Cloud-based online backup solutions are paramount for protecting data coming from your home, your employees and your office.

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About Miguel Leiva-Gomez

Miguel Leiva-Gomez is the owner of The Tech Guy, a blog that presents futuristic and current news about technology with a light touch of humor, catering to the average consumer and prospective investor. Miguel has been working with computers and gadgets for more than a decade, working together with people to help them solve their problems and breaking down complex concepts into simple bite-sized pieces that the average Joe can chew.

  • wme43wme

    You definitely want to go with a reputable company to backup your most important files and photos. Even though I highly recommend it is important to know how a system actually works when it comes to how a file is backed up, the truth of the matter is, most consumers don’t really care whether their files are synced, or whether all online backup system work the same. All that consumers really care about is the price, and if their system where to crash, will they be able to retrieve what’s important to them, and if their files are encrypted and protected.

    In the end, backing up your files is truly the best way to go. Being able to access your files from anywhere can be a life saver especially, if your files were ever lost or stolen.

    http://goo.gl/BzFQ0

  • http://www.peterfretty.com/ Peter Fretty

    Great list! As compliance and privacy enter the equation, SMBs need to look at what set-ups make the most sense without causing any issues. Most find a hybrid (private/public arrangement) makes the most sense. When properly planned the journey usually starts with storage/backup continues to include virtualization as well as infrastructure and platform solutions, etc. SMBs need the efficiencies and scalability, but they also need to education themselves along the way.  VMWare has a self assessment that can prove quite helpful. 

    • http://Smallbiztechnology.com/ Ramon Ray

      Hybrid for sure -t hanks Peter…

  • San Mah

    I think the main power of cloud backup is its syncing feature. I am looking for an app that would sync my PC to cloud server without prompting me for file duplication or replacement. In the other words I am looking for an app that is smart enough to analyze the same files and copy only new ones without my permission. Though there may an additional option through which I can restrict the app to prompt me for duplication/replacement.

    • http://Smallbiztechnology.com Ramon Ray

      I believe Carbonite does this quite well..

      • San Mah

         Thanks Ramon

  • Scott Spooner

    Great advice! I especially agree myth 4, I live in the countryside so my internet is painfully slow so reviving any files from the cloud can take a while. I prefer using dropbox to individually save important files that i defiantly don’t want to use and keep a external hard drive that i back up every week with. A recommendation from my IT Support guys :)

    • http://Smallbiztechnology.com/ Ramon Ray

      Hey Scott – you country folk! :)

      • Scott Spooner

        Haha hey Ramon, going strong here at 1mbps ;)