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Executive Spotlight: Liz Pearce Helped Liquid Planner Find Success Through Old-Fashioned Hard Work

When she was only 35, Liz Pearce took over Seattle-based LiquidPlanner, making her the youngest CEO in the area. At the time, the online project management tool was still just a startup with no capital backing. Pearce believed in the company, however, having served as its COO for six years. Without any venture capital backing, Pearce and her team helped the company find success through old-fashioned hard work.

Pearce was brought in at LiquidPlanner’s inception due to her extensive marketing expertise. After obtaining her master’s degree from George Washington University, Pearce joined the staff of Sony as promotions assistant. Pearce’s marketing efforts for the company’s PlayStation line enabled her to make valuable connections in the industry, as well as growing the product’s exposure worldwide.

After a brief stint in marketing at Google, Pearce joined Amazon as a project manager. During her two years with the world’s largest online retailer, Pearce launched Amazon’s wedding registry, including a redesign and interactive tools. She also oversaw the company’s move into short-form digital literature, both overseeing the project and bringing in worldwide media attention for the new offering.

In 2005, Pearce left Amazon to form her own marketing firm, Liz Pearce Consulting. She was able to hone her marketing skills by working with a variety of clients as they developed marketing plans and launched ad campaigns. This experience, combined with her years of work with other tech ventures, made her an ideal candidate when LiquidPlanner’s founders were looking for someone to head up the company’s marketing efforts.

As LiquidPlanner launched, Liz Pearce spearheaded the company’s sales and marketing efforts, leveraging her years of experience to help the company create strategies and network with others in the industry. Pearce also headed up the company’s online strategy, which included search engine and social media marketing efforts.

In 2011, Pearce moved up to COO for LiquidPlanner, managing the company’s cash flow and coming up with marketing and business strategies for the non-technical side of the company. Under Pearce’s operational leadership, LiquidPlanner’s revenue continued to grow, with a 200 percent growth during the past two years. Over time, Pearce’s efforts caught the eye of founders, who were looking for someone to take over for then-CEO and co-founder Charles Seybold. Seybold was interested in moving into a design and product management position with the company, so it was important to bring in a CEO who could take over the work to free up his time to concentrate on other areas.

Since taking over as CEO in August 2012, Pearce serves both as the voice of the company and the driving force behind its success. Today, LiquidPlanner boasts more than 1,100 paying customers in 50 countries across multiple industries, including software development, engineering, and transportation. The company’s clients include such big names as Pitney Bowes, HTC, Honeywell, and Citrix.

Businesses of all sizes are using LiquidPlanner to manage projects effortlessly and inexpensively. Plans start at only $24 per user per month with a 30-day trial to allow them to try the product out. For more information on LiquidPlanner or Liz Pearce, visit the company’s website at https://www.liquidplanner.com/.

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About Stephanie Faris

Stephanie is a freelance writer and young adult/middle grade novelist, who worked in information systems for more than a decade. Her first book, 30 Days of No Gossip, will be released by Simon and Schuster in spring 2014. She lives in Nashville with her husband.

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